Loader
Women and the labor market: where are they? - Global Packing
1276
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-1276,single-format-standard,bridge-core-1.0.5,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,hide_top_bar_on_mobile_header,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-theme-ver-18.1,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.0.2,vc_responsive
 

Women and the labor market: where are they?

Worldwide, we honor the month of March to women. This time, we from Global Packing Moving & Relocation decided to do something special. In addition to paying homage and our attention to women, this month we seek to point out important issues for the female cause, among them: the women’s role in the labor market.

After all, women did not join world of work yesterday and their participation is not low. According to the 2018 IBGE survey, women make up 43.8% of current Brazilian workers. However, women earn an average of 20.5% less than men in Brazil and in absolutely all areas of the country their pay is lower than the equivalent for men.

Wage inequality between genders is a worldwide problem and in Brazil the issue worsens as schooling and academic training increases and also according to the hierarchical position in the workplace. Thus, a woman with an MBA or a specialization is paid 35 to 42% less than a man with the same training. In addition, in the position of president, director or manager, women receive, on average, 38.41% less than a man in the same position.

As always, the Brazilian female issue is also crossed by racial issues. In 2018, the annual income of white people was 73.9% higher than that of blacks and browns in Brazil. In this scenario, black women receive on average 44.4% of the monthly income of the average white man, that is, less than half this average salary. And, in relation to white women, black women earn 41.4%, placing them at the base of the Brazilian wage pyramid, representing the most acute wage inequality in the country.

But, what to do in the face of this scenario? Iceland, for example, is a pioneer in implementing a gender equal wages law. This is an excellent action to combat this problem structurally! However, when it comes to us individually and institutionally, we from Global Packing are proud not only to have a female director, a representative of the 25.85% of female directors in Brazil, but we also have a more than competent and mostly female office team! In our office, the wages are equal and we are always engaged in the social discussions of our time in order to make the experience of working at Global as enriching, comfortable, harmonious and productive as possible!

There is is a long way to go for equal pay between genders in Brazil and in the world, but we at Global Packing try to do our part as a company for our employees in order to achieve a fairer and better society!

No Comments

Post A Comment